60 Top Hat Piano Grooves Free with in-app purchases ready for sale.

Originally posted on Music App Developer:

After 12 days waiting for review, 60 Top Hat Piano Grooves Free version 1.2 is now ready for sale.

The user has now the option of purchasing a preferred groove module. For example: If you’d like to access all the Rock & Pop grooves only, you may do so by purchasing only that module.

I think this will be a nice feature on the free version since the user already has access to two grooves for every single style. They can try them and choose the style they want to work with first and then when they are ready they can download the next module.

Apple does send you a nice email with all the details:

iTunes Connect
Dear Ariel Ramos,
The following app has been approved and the app status has changed to Ready for Sale:

App Name: 60 Top Hat Piano Grooves Vol. 1 FREE
App Version…

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20 Saxophone Tricks of the Trade on the App Store

20 Saxophone Tricks of the Trade by Mario Cerra is now available on the App Store

A new Saxophone App with plenty of tricks and tips is now available on the App Store for the iPad & iPhone in English and Spanish. Award winner saxophonist Mario Cerra (Boston, USA) explains and demonstrates 20 musical concepts and sax tricks & tips that you can easily add to your playing.

Sax appSax app icon

20 Saxophone Tricks Of The Trade will provide you with plenty of resources to land your next gig. Use your new hot licks to impress fellow musicians, family and friends and promote your music career!

Here’s a complete list of topics in this app:
Lester: Using overtones to create a variety of tonal colors
Mix Them Up: Using overtones to create a variety of colors
Side D: Three different fingerings for the middle D
Dexter: Effect for Bb-G trill
John’s way: Example of multiphonics
The Wolf: How to make your horn growl
Slide: Glissando, or bending notes
Ghosts: Ghosting and accenting notes for great articulation
The “Cannon” Effect: Great combination of trills
S-S-P: Skip-Step concept on pentatonic scale
S-S-B: Skip-Step concept on blues scale
Jazz it up: How to produce an essential accent in jazz
Tension: Using a pentatonic scale on altered dominant chords
Release: Using a pentatonic scale on Maj 7th chords
Blues and Motives: Creating strong motives within the blues scale
Four and One: Playing four consecutive 8th notes and one 8th rest
Three on Four: Rhythmic displacement: 3/4 over 4/4
Five on Four: Rhythmic displacement: 5/4 over 4/4
Flashy: Bend and trill
Pure Expression: How to practice vibrato

Read more on mDecks.com

Reharmonizing the V7 with the SubV7

One of the most-often-used re-harmonization of the V7 is done by replacing that chord with the subV7.

Which chord is the subV7
The subV7 is a dominant chord a tritone away from the V7 (also a half step above the tonic or I)

Why does the subV7 work as a substitute of the V7?
There are two main reasons why this chord is such a perfect substitute for the V7

  • The guide tones (3 & 7) are the same in both functions.
    The 3 & 7 in the subV7 are the 7 & 3 in V7. The guide tones are the notes that give the chord its characteristic sound. In dominant chords, the guide tone (3,7) are a tritone apart. The tritone is an interval with lots of tension, [it used to be called "The devil's interval" back in the middle ages] , which wants to resolve by moving each note half a step in opposite directions, thus turning into a major 3rd (when resolving inward) or a minor 6th (when resolving outward)
    Example: In the key of C • G7 is the V7 • 3rd is B • 7th is F (since it is a flat seventh in dominants). B-F is a tritone. It wants to resolve either: inward to C-E (major 3rd) or, outward to Bb-Gb (minor 6th). A tritone apart from G is Db which would be the root of the subV7 in the key of C, and the guide tones in Db are F (the 3rd) and C flat (the flat 7th, which is B). Thus, we can resolve those two notes, as if we were in G7, to E and C, the tritone then resolves as expected in the key of C from Db7.
  • The root of the subV7 is a half step above the I (tonic)
    The bass-line for a V7-I progression moves down a perfect fifth (which is a very powerful bass movement).
    When substituting the V7 with the subV7, the bass-line for the subV7-I is moving a half step down (which is as strong as the perfect fifth). Substituting the V7 with the subV7 gives us a strong bass-line that resolves tension well.

Here are the two examples using Mapping Tonal Harmony Pro 5 to view the different paths taken when using the V7 and/or the subV7 in the progression IIm7 – V7 – I (2-5-1)

Mapping Tonal Harmony 2-5-1 harmonic progression

The standard jazz progression (2-5-1) shown functionally in Mapping Tonal Harmony Pro

subv

The standard subV7 substitution shown functionally in Mapping Tonal Harmony Pro

The standard subV7 substitution shown in the key of Eb major in Mapping Tonal Harmony Pro

The standard subV7 substitution shown in the key of Eb major in Mapping Tonal Harmony Pro